Stop And Have a Feel

Universal health care, and universal basic income. These are two topics that liberal peaceniks love to go on about. Different groups of people have different opinions about these ideas and many objections. However, these objections all seem to be rational reasons involving implementation. I wonder what they would think if they took a moment to really feel what these things would be like.

For the liberal peacenik crowd UHC, and UBI would feel like security. A major source of anxiety and fear would be removed from their lives. They would be able to turn their concerns to other issues and could rest in the comfort of knowing that if they chose to volunteer their time for good works there would still be food on the table, a roof over their heads at night, and some help if they met with an accident.

For the impoverished, these things would be nothing short of a godsend. Desperation would flee from their world view, and they would be able to focus their minds on things they want, like education, a chance to engage in life, and no need to turn to less than legal means of making ends meet.

For the (dwindling) middle class, and the small business owner, this would feel like more people with the means to frequent their businesses. More people would be able to eat out at restaurants. More people would have the funds to support local shops. In addition, UHC and UBI would mean relief from twinges of guilt when catching a glimpse of the current truth on their news and social feeds. The inconvenient truth that people are starving in the streets. Children are homeless. Desperation haunts our nation. Once UHC and UBI were in place, you would feel that these issues were at least being worked on.

For the big business owner, this would feel like a release from the headaches of providing health insurance for their employees as that would be handled by the government. There would also be the feeling of assurance of a population where everyone has at least some disposable capital to spend at the businesses in question. Lastly, I think that all business owners could get a good amount of comfort from knowing that their employees want to be there, rather than needing to be there.

I am aware that there are a whole slew of logistical issues with implementing UHC and UBI, especially in my country (the United States.) That’s the cool things about humans though, when we want to get something done (usually for a reason sourced in some kind of emotional investment, positive or negative) we figure it out. My point with this post is that maybe if we let ourselves deeply feel what living in a society with UHC and UBI systems in place, we will be sufficiently motivated to make them work with minimal adjustment pain along the way.

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Choose Where You Blossom

One of the models for personal development that I enjoy is the 8-Circuit model of consciousness as originated by Timothy Leary, and further developed by my hero, Robert Anton Wilson. I find it a very useful framework for tracking where I am, and what I can use improvement on. (There’s a lot.)

Another model I find quite useful is the Jewish Mysticism system of Kabbalah. I don’t pretend to have anywhere near the knowledge of Kabbalah that I do of the 8-Circuit model, but there are some components that have helped me out a great deal. There is a place where the 8-circuit model and an important concept from the Kabbalah tradition intersect. I’d like to share that with you today.

First up, the 8-Circuit model. The idea here is that there are eight systems or circuits, that human development moves through. The first four are common to the bulk of humanity. They are settled enough into the regular course of human that pretty much everyone develops them during their life. The second four are those that represent the possibilities that human beings can access, given the opportunity, intention, training, and/or a bit of luck.

Circuit one is the bio-survival circuit. This is the circuit concerned with physical safety, comfort, basic survival, eating, and touch. The basic tactic here is moving towards that which nurtures, and away from that which harms.

Next up is the emotional-territorial circuit. This has to do with learning your place in the local pecking order. Domination and submission. Territoriality. Basic hierarchies. Aggressive versus cooperative behavior.

Next, we have the neuro-semantic circuit. This is the introduction and mastery of language. Also the creation of mental maps for dealing with the territory of reality and society. This is also where you learn more manual dexterity, and start the construction and manipulation of your personal environment. This is the “time-binding” circuit pointed out by Alfred Korzybski. That unique thing about being human that lets us efficiently, and easily pass our acquired knowledge from one generation to the next.

Then we get to the socio-sexual sexual circuit. Here we get morals and socially acceptable methods for reproduction, sexual interaction, and care of the young. This is where we work up social networks and work out our place in the “social contract.”

This is as far as most people get and is essentially the “center of gravity” for current evolution of the species. Each of the first four circuits have enough depth, and nuance for any person to explore and grow in got a whole lifetime.

If the individual continues their development, probably facilitated by some deep insight, or paradigm break, they will move on to the next available circuit, the neurosomatic circuit. These breaks with accepted reality can be conjured by the use of some sort of boundary dissolving compound, such as hallucinogenics. This is the bliss circuit. Deep consciousness of the body. This circuit allows for intentional somatic reprogramming, the willful re-casting of our relationship to the soma, the body.

The sixth circuit is the neuro-electric, or metaprogramming circuit. This is where the nervous system becomes aware of itself. With this opening, it becomes possible to re-imprint and re-program the earlier circuits in accordance with your own conscious design. Got a hang up around transgender dressing? No worries, you can adjust so that your comfort is no longer compromised by someone else dressing in accordance with a gender that doesn’t match their current biology (or, more honestly your own expectations).

Next up we have the neuro-genetic circuit. This is where you open up the genetic record of your own being too conscious inspection. This allows access to racial, and evolutionary collective knowledge. Ancestral contact, access to the DNA-RNA feedback dance, past lives, reincarnation, and intimations of how one would deal with immortality.

The final (as far as we know) circuit is the quantum non-local circuit. Here we are talking about awareness of a non-local variety. Global space-time consciousness not bound by the speed of light. Here come images of Indira’s Net of Buddhism. The vast knowing of the near death experience.

The first four circuits are those most easily available to the “run of the mill” humanity of today. Indeed, it’s these first four circuits that each of us is pushed through in order to be fully qualified as members of acceptable society.

The next four seem to be available options open to any human who will but take the appropriate steps to access them. We have evidence, increasingly anecdotal as you progress up the circuits, of humans who have accessed these capacities. Advanced yogis, and meditators plainly have access to the neurosomatic circuit and can intentionally move into states of bliss and oceanic consciousness.

As we move up the circuits we have to come to terms, more and more, with things like constantly available clarity of the source of our own thoughts, clairvoyance, telepathy, reading of the Akashic records, trance medium conversation with the deceased, and so on. Whether you decide to give these reports credence, or not, they do exist. We do not seem to be able to get away from these stories, so (I would submit) that there is something going on there.

Okay, so what does all of this have to do with Kabbalah? Glad you asked.

One of the ideas nurtured in the Kabbalah system is that of conceiving of yourself as a plant, of a kind, and has to do with the garden you are situated in. They use this analogy to analyze the level of agency one can have over the direction of their own life.

Before you are born, the bloodlines of your making came together and decided to have an offspring. You have nothing to say about that (in this model.)

Then you are born into a family situation dictated by your parents and their family of choosing. Again, you have no choice there.

Next, you get your pre-school education, care, and training. These are at the discretion of your caretakers. You have very little choice here.

Then comes your primary schooling. Again, the choice of school, and therefore the environment that shapes you is under the purview of your family, and the educational bureaucracy of the city you live in.

Then you get to high-school. Still, this place of development is dictated to you by others. You get to express some of yourself at this point by choosing your electives, though that choice will probably be influenced by what your parents find acceptable.

Then comes college. Here you actually enter the picture as a decision maker. This is the turning point. Now you have some say about the “garden” you will flourish in. You get to make real choices about how you evolve and unfold.

After you are done with college (or, if you don’t go to college) you go out “into the world” to stand on your own two feet. Here you have maximal say about where you will develop. Here you become your own gardener if you choose to. Some do not choose to, and at this point just go along with the momentum and in the direction instilled in them during their earlier years when they had no choice.

Here is where I see the two models coming together. Essentially, the society and familial setting you are born into dictates to a large degree the imprinting, and conditioning, of the first four circuits.

The next four represent choice and free will. As you advance up them, you find more and more access to self-determination and direction. Moving up these circuits is something you must choose to do. Even though access to them may be opened up through outside agencies, the development of them seems to be a matter of one’s own choosing.

We are all born with certain characteristics, traits, and qualities. Those are ours to work with for all of our lives. We are also all born into a context, not of our choosing. That too is ours to work with and eventually to change should we wish too. As we grow we each have the opportunity to become the gardeners of our own development.

Where do you choose to grow? What do you choose to grow in to?

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Do It Until You Know What’s Next

Today I’ve been poking away at a fiction story about an accidental guru, and blog posts about not second guessing your happiness, realizations versus answers, some possible trajectories about self-inquiry, and an intro to a series about the Integral Model. While doing all that, I realized why I write several posts simultaneously.

One of my favorite pieces of advice to writers comes from Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway recommended that you should, “write until you… know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again.” I have found this a supremely effective tool for writing at a good clip and avoiding writer’s block. If you sit down knowing what will happen next, you have no pause to doubt yourself.

What I have recently seen is this advice is just as good for writing non-fiction pieces. You write until you know what you are going to say next, and stop. Since non-fiction writing involves a lot of saying specific points, you can get to this point rather quickly. That is why I work on several pieces at once. I can plunk away at a post, get to the point where I have a clear notion of my next point, and skip to a different post. It’s a little bit like cooking a meal with several dishes all at once. (Without the pressure of needing them to get done fairly close to each other so the dishes don’t get to room temperature before they are eaten.)

Not every suggestion works well for everyone. However, if you are a writer, and find yourself frequently hitting “dry spells” you might try Hemingway’s little gem out. Let me know how it goes if you do.

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